Wednesday, February 5, 2020

International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation, 6 February



Abida and her child live in Ethiopia’s Afar Region. In Afar, the prevalence of female genital mutilation has fallen sharply — down to 31% in some districts — in areas where the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on the Elimination of FGM is supporting community-led interventions. Photo: Sara Elgamal for UNFPA

Ending Female Genital Mutilation by 2030

Female genital mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures that involve altering or injuring the female genitalia for non-medical reasons and is recognized internationally as a violation of the human rights, the health and the integrity of girls and women.

Girls who undergo female genital mutilation face short-term complications such as severe pain, shock, excessive bleeding, infections, and difficulty in passing urine, as well as long-term consequences for their sexual and reproductive health and mental health.

Although primarily concentrated in 30 countries in Africa and the Middle East, female genital mutilation is a universal problem and is also practiced in some countries in Asia and Latin America. Female genital mutilation continues to persist amongst immigrant populations living in Western Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand.

To promote the elimination of female genital mutilation, coordinated and systematic efforts are needed, and they must engage whole communities and focus on human rights, gender equality, sexual education and attention to the needs of women and girls who suffer from its consequences.



2020 Theme: Unleashing Youth Power

In 2012, the UN General Assembly designated February 6th as the International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation, with the aim to amplify and direct the efforts on the elimination of this practice.

Ending female genital mutilation in one decade will require support from every quarter. With significant population growth, especially among youth, investing in young people becomes indispensable. That is why this International Day will focus on mobilizing youth around the eliminations of harmful practices, including female genital mutilation under the theme: "Unleashing Youth Power: One decade of accelerating actions for zero female genital mutilation."


UN Action

Although the practice has been around for more than a thousand years, there are reasons to think that female genital mutilation could end in a single generation. That is why the United Nations strives for its full eradication by 2030, following the spirit of Sustainable Development Goal 5.

Since 2008, UNFPA, jointly with UNICEF, leads the largest global programme to accelerate the elimination of female genital mutilation. The programme currently focuses on 17 countries in Africa and the Middle East and also supports regional and global initiatives.

Over the years, this partnership has seen significant achievements. For instance, more than 3.3 million girls and women supported by the Joint Programme have benefited from female genital mutilation-related protection and care services, and 13 countries have established legal frameworks for banning female genital mutilation and have established national budget lines funding programmes to address it.

Did You Know?
  • In 2020 alone, there are 4.1 million girls around the world are at risk of undergoing female genital mutilation.
  • According to UNFPA, the cost of preventing female genital mutilation is $95 per girl today.
  • 30 countries where female genital mutilation is prevalent are experiencing high population growth, with at least 30 percent of girls undergoing female population under the age of 15.
  • Young people aged 15 to 19 in countries where female genital mutilation is prevalent are less supportive of continuing the practice than are adults aged 45 to 49.
  • In many countries where female genital mutilation is prevalent, young girls have a dramatically increased chance of growing up without the risk of undergoing this harmful practice compared to their mothers and grandmothers.

 Female genital mutilation (FGM) frequently asked questions


UN event

"A Piece of Me" (by the filmmaker Sara Elgamal) immersive exhibit & panel discussion. February 6, 11am-1pm at UN Headquarters, NY. RSVP.

In first person: “A piece of me”

"A Piece of Me" is a UNFPA campaign, celebrating three survivors of female genital mutilation (FGM) with the aim to spread awareness to end FGM. Shot like a fashion film in the desert of the Afar region of Ethiopia with captivating images and colours - showcasing Zahra, Abida and Khadija our three survivors, the filmmaker, Sara Elgamal, celebrates the strength and story of these women.

#EndFGM #YouthEndFGM

Source: United Nations



Sunday, January 26, 2020

Build a fundraising campaign for Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation, Inc on ALMA



Help us raise funds this year by creating a beautiful fundraiser

You can customize your campaign for Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation, Inc. Update your page with your own images, stories, and optional campaign dates. Friends can donate easily in just a few clicks using a credit card, Apple Pay or Google Pay.


Give with confidence

ALMA takes zero platform fees, where GoFundMe and others take up to 10% of donations. We take none and allow donors to tip if they choose. Only 3% is taken by our payment providers, 97%
goes to Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation, Inc, so more of your donation will go directly to Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation, Inc.


What we do

PROGRAM 1 
Clean water wells in Ghana.

The Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation will be building several wells to service 3 communities in Tamale, the capital of the Northern Region of Ghana. The Kunyeville, Paring, and Sheshagu/Gbambaya community with a total population of 28,000, each well will provide clean water for up to 5-6 families, or 30 users maximum per well. We will also be building toilets and sanitation wash stations.

PROGRAM 2
Building toilets in Ghana

The Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation will be building several wells to service 3 communities in Tamale, the capital of the Northern Region of Ghana. The Kunyeville, Paring, and Sheshagu/Gbambaya community with a total population of 28,000, each well will provide clean water for up to 5-6 families, or 30 users maximum per well. We will also be building toilets and sanitation wash stations.

PROGRAM 3
Safe Playground for United Faith Nursery and Basic School - Jamaica

United Faith Nursery & Basic School caters for 50 children 6 months old to 6 years old. It is situated in the inner city of Olympic Gardens, Kingston, Jamaica where 80% of our parents are unemployed. The playground currently has only 3 car tires that the children play around with and we aim to build slides, swings & climbers. We want it to be child-friendly and very relaxing for them. It is required that the children play 90 minutes per day but not having a safe playground makes it impossible.

PROGRAM 4
Junior Development Program - Innovation Learning Space - Ghana

An Innovation Learning Space equipped with IT tools and creative spaces to assist children from undeveloped and disadvantaged backgrounds in Ghana with the knowledge of the Sustainable Development Goals, relevant digital skills, creative skills development, and leadership training in order to better equip them to meet the global competition and to break the cycle of poverty.



How I Benefited from TLBBH Foundation & BLP #LearnTeachSDGs Class



My name is Elizabeth A. Camara, A 21-years-old, from Gambia West Africa. I am An American Corner Intern and I advocate for Climate Change, Peace and Humanity.

I am passionate about Change.

6 months ago I join an online Study class on Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Which was organized by The Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation in partnership with Bright Light Projects. This #LearnTeachSDGs initiative's mission was to reach out to many people as possible and educate them on the benefits of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and The Importance of implementing and supporting these goals. The classes were focused on teaching people from around the world about the Sustainable Development Goals. Why and when they were established, how they can be achieved before 2030, Who established them and how the future of the Human race depends on these Goals.


That was my First time learning about The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and how they tally with my advocacy and my passion for change. The classes when on for a whole month then we were given a quiz which I passed and received a certificate and Now I am an SDG Ambassador at Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation.


More to the Above, After learning about The SDG and becoming An SDG Ambassador. I decided to start implementing and sharing everything I have learned.


I organized a Two(2)days Workshop teaching and raising awareness on the SDGs. I collaborated UNDP Banjul, expects on the areas of SDG goals, Rise & Shine Media, American Corner Interns & Volunteers, and The American Embassy Banjul funded the event, on rising awareness on SDG in the Gambia with 40 participants, They were all given Certificate for participating and We are about to start our Action plans. We realized that all the goals were interrelated so we put them into 3 main components which are; Social Development, Economic Development, and Environmental Development.

 

 
 

 I am passionate about Change.

Special Thanks to the Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation and the Bright Light Projects for such an impactful initiative.




 The Lady B Bless Humanitarian Foundation Bright Light Projects


Saturday, January 18, 2020

Women Who Changed The World in the Last Century

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Women Who Changed The World in the Last Century
BY KATHLEEN RELLIHAN ON 01/16/20 AT 6:00 AM EST
Source: https://www.newsweek.com

In honor of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment, which guaranteed women's right to vote in the U.S., Newsweek is looking at other impressive female advancements around the world over the last century.

From the first woman to rocket into space to the activists who gathered for a record-breaking Women's March, solo or in groups, women have set records and forged paths forward against all odds.
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1. Equality in Sports Texas (1973)
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Regarded as one of the greatest women's tennis players of all time,
Billie Jean King earned a six-time world No. 1 ranking and 39 Grand Slam titles. Her crusade for pay equality gained the largest-ever worldwide audience for a tennis match—over 90 million—when she defeated "self-proclaimed chauvinist" Bobby Riggs in the "Battle of the Sexes" at the Houston Astrodome


2. Mother of Civil Rights Alabama (1955)

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Rosa Parks' refusal to give up her seat and go to the back of a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama, ignited one of the largest social resistance movements in history. The Montgomery Bus Boycott was the igniting event that set off the U.S. civil rights movement.

3. Women's March Washington, D.C. (2017)
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The Women's March held on January 21, 2017, broke records and ignited a modern-day protest movement. Advocating for legislation and policies to protect women's rights, around half a million protesters marched in Washington, D.C., and it spread to more than 500 other marches around the U.S. and 81 more countries.

4. Aviation Pioneer Newfoundland, Canada to Northern Ireland (1932)
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Amelia Earhart was the first woman to fly nonstop and solo across the Atlantic. Several years later in 1937, she disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean while attempting to circumnavigate the globe; theories about her mysterious disappearance still endure.


5. Head of State Iceland (1980)

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Icelandic politician Vigdís Finnbogadóttir was the first woman to be directly elected president. Her 16-year presidency was also the longest of any elected female head of state.


6. Nobel Peace Prize Kenya (2004)
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Wangari Maathai, a Kenyan environmental activist, was the first African woman to win a Nobel Peace Prize. The pioneering ecologist founded a grassroots movement aimed at empowering rural women's groups toward conservation and improving their quality of life, resulting in the largest tree-planting campaigns in Africa.

7. Freedom to Drive Saudia Arabia (2017)
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After years of campaigning by women's rights activists and fighting hard against opposition, women regained the freedom to legally drive in Saudia Arabia—the only country in the world banning female drivers. Activists are hopeful this change paves the path for additional progress in women's rights in the kingdom.

8. Woman in Space Russia (1963)
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Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova was the first woman to travel into space, orbiting Earth 48 times in almost 3 days. Though she logged only a single trip, Tereshkova still holds the claim to being the only woman to fly to space solo, and the youngest—at 26 years old.

9. Summiting Peaks Nepal (1975)
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Junko Tabei was the first woman to summit Mount Everest, the world's highest peak. The Japanese climber went on to reach peaks in 76 different countries and also became the first woman to conquer the "Seven Summits," the highest mountain on each continent.

10. Climate Change Pioneers Antarctica (2016)
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The largest-ever all-female expedition to Antarctica sought to raise awareness and increase female representation in top science jobs. The Homeward Bound mission sent 76 women scientists to observe the effect of climate change on the southernmost continent firsthand.